Schererville History

Long before Indiana became a state, long before the founding of Schererville, people called this place the "Crossroads." The name was appropriate, for several Indian trails intersected here that later became routes for the wagons of settlers traveling west.

One of those settlers was Nicholas Scherer, who arrived in the U.S. from Germany in 1846. When he came to this place at the southern tip of Lake Michigan in 1866, he founded the community that bears his name.

Today, trails still cross at Schererville, the modern trails of a motorized society, U.S. Highways 41 and 30. Nearby are newer trails, I-80/94 and I-65. All these are primary transcontinental routes and gives Schererville its slogan: "Crossroads of the Nation."

Since the 1990s, Schererville has attracted many former Illinois residents. The town's strategic location, reasonable housing costs, and high level of municipal services have contributed to its growth in recent years.

The town was named one of the "100 Best Places to Live in the U.S." by Money Magazine in 2007.

 

Munster History

The earliest known inhabitants of the area were the Potawatomi. Although a village did not exist in what was to become Munster's town boundaries, a trail along the dry sandy ridge now known as Ridge Road was well traveled by the tribe. Today, Munster's downtown area, the Town Hall, Police and Fire Department headquarters, the Centre for the Visual and Performing Arts, and the Munster Post Office are all situated on Ridge Road.

In the late 17th and early 18th centuries, the area that is today Munster was part of land claimed by France as French territory. In the 1760s the British claimed the land where the Potawatomi lived as part of the British Empire. Twenty years later George Rogers Clark overran the British, claiming the land for the new and independent country known as the United States of America. In 1828 the federal government relocated the Potawatomi Indians to the Oklahoma territory.

As the numbers of native Americans dwindled, pioneer settlers began to inhabit the area which would become Munster.

When Jacob Munster, a young man from the Netherlands who until the 1860s spelled his surname "Monster,"opened an area General Store complete with a U.S. postal station on the back, the local farmers and settlers came to rely on the postal station, which soon became a United States Post Office. The post office was named Munster, as it was located in Jacob Munster's general store.

Before long more and more people moved to the "Munster" Area, and in 1907 Munster was incorporated as a town, with 76 residents voting "yes" for the incorporation and 28 voting "no."

Munster soon became a booming town that attracted many people. Munster saw difficult times through the rough years of the Great Depression and the two World Wars, like many other new towns in America.

During the Cold War, Munster served as the site of the Nike-Zeus Missile defense base C-46. The site was closed in 1971, and is now under private ownership.

In September 2008, Munster's northern portions suffered record flooding resulting from the impact of Hurricane Ike, which caused the Little Calumet River to overflow. A main break occurred in the levee located near the intersection of Calumet Avenue and River Drive in the northwest quadrant of the town. Munster has requested the Army Corps of Engineers to elevate the levee in low lying areas.

As of present, the levee improvements have been completed and the majority of homes destroyed have been rebuilt, in most cases, with larger, more amenity-filled homes.

The 2010 Comprehensive Plan for Munster's next twenty years includes plans for a new town center with upscale shopping and dining to be organized around a proposed train station.

 

History Lansing

The first family to settle in Lansing was that of August Hildebrandt in 1843. Henry, George, and John Lansing settled the area in 1846, which was incorporated in 1893. Early settlement in the village was primarily by Dutch and German immigrants. Industrial development of the surrounding Calumet region attracted immigrants from Ireland and Eastern Europe to the village in the 20th century. These settlement patterns are reflected in Lansing's current demographics; according to the census of 2000, the top five non African-American ancestries in Lansing were German (17%), Polish (13%), Irish (13%), Dutch (11%), and Italian (7%).

 

Dyer is a town in St. John TownshipLake CountyIndianaUnited States. The population was 16,390 at the 2010 census.

This bedroom community lies in the Chicago Metropolitan Area.

Dyer placed 97th on the "100 Best Places to Live in the US" by CNN and Money Magazine in 2005. It was one of two Indiana municipalities to earn this distinction (the other being Fishers outside Indianapolis).

Geography

 Dyer is located at 41°30′01″N 87°30′44″W (41.500218, -87.512161).

Dyer borders Munster to the north, unincorporated St. John Townshipto the south, Schererville to the east, and Lynwood and Sauk Village in Illinois to the west. The Illinois state line comprises Dyer's entire western border. One of Dyer's neighborhoods, Briar Ridge, spans both Dyer and adjacent Schererville.

Dyer is built on mostly flat land with an exception being the steep sand ridge south of US Highway 30. This is the Glenwood Shoreline.

According to the 2010 census, Dyer has a total area of 6.1 square miles (15.80 km2), all land.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 545
1920 479 −12.1%
1930 672 40.3%
1940 976 45.2%
1950 1,556 59.4%
1960 3,993 156.6%
1970 4,906 22.9%
1980 9,555 94.8%
1990 10,923 14.3%
2000 13,895 27.2%
2010 16,390 18.0%
Est. 2015 16,051 [10] −2.1%
Source:[5]

As of 2009, the median income for a household in the town was $76,599 while the mean income for a household in the town was $93,308. The median income for a family was $87,127 and the mean income for a family was $103,563. The estimated per capita income for the town was $34,275. About 0.7% of families and 1.2% of the population were estimated to be below the poverty line.

2010 census

 As of the census of 2010, there were 16,390 people, 5,985 households, and 4,552 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,686.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,037.4/km2). There were 6,125 housing units at an average density of 1,004.1 per square mile (387.7/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 90.1% White, 2.5% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.9% Asian, 2.4% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.3% of the population.

There were 5,985 households of which 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.8% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 23.9% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.12.

The median age in the town was 42.9 years. 23.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 22.9% were from 25 to 44; 31.4% were from 45 to 64; and 15.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

History

 In 1830, the first permanent white settlers came to Northwest Indiana. The earliest historical records date back to 1838. On June 1, 1855, the original plat of the town[1] was established. Aaron Norton Hart, a settler from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, played a key role in developing Dyer's infrastructure in the 1860s and 1870s. Hart supervised construction of roads and the implementation of a drainage ditch system, allowing agricultural and commercial use of the marshy land. Hart was killed in 1883 while working on a ditch near Plum Creek. Hart Street, one of Dyer's major north-south streets, bears his name. Hart's wife, Martha Dyer Hart, is the town's namesake.

Dyer was incorporated as a town under Indiana law on February 8, 1910. Upon incorporation, Dyer was divided into three wards: The first ward consisted of all land within town limits lying west of Hart Street; the second ward comprised the section east of Hart Street and south of Lincoln Highway; the land north of Lincoln Highway and east of Hart Street formed the third ward.

Meyer's Castle was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Transportation

Roads: Dyer's primary arterial road is U.S. Route 30/Lincoln Highway, which runs east-west through the town. A 1.3-mile (2.1 km) stretch of this route traversing Dyer and Schererville was considered one of the most prominent Seedling Mile projects on theLincoln Highway when it was constructed in the early 1920s, and came to be known as the highway's "Ideal Section." It remains in use to this day.

Amtrak

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Dyer at the Dyer Amtrak Station. The station is served by the Cardinal with service to Chicago Union Station andNew York Penn Station via Washington D.C.'s Union Station. On the days that the Cardinal does not run, the Hoosier State connects Indianapolis to Chicago, where connecting trains take passengers to other destinations in the Amtrak system.

 

St. John is a town in Lake CountyIndianaUnited States. The town of St. John has homes in St. John TownshipHanover Township, and Center Township. St. John was founded in 1837. The population was 14,850 at the 2010 census. In 2009, St. John ranked 48th among CNN's top 100 places to live in the United States. In 2014, St. John was ranked as the 4th safest place in Indiana by Movoto Real Estate.

 

 

History

The St. John post office was established in 1846. The town was named for John Hack, a pioneer settler.

The Francis P. Keilman House was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

Geography

St. John is located at 41°26′54″N 87°28′36″W.

According to the 2010 census, St. John has a total area of 11.481 square miles (29.74 km2), of which 11.39 square miles (29.50 km2) (or 99.21%) is land and 0.091 square miles (0.24 km2) (or 0.79%) is water.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 40
1920 279
1930 332 19.0%
1940 383 15.4%
1950 684 78.6%
1960 1,128 64.9%
1970 1,757 55.8%
1980 3,974 126.2%
1990 4,921 23.8%
2000 8,382 70.3%
2010 14,850 77.2%
Est. 2015 16,495 [12] 11.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 14,850 people, 5,047 households, and 4,225 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,303.8 inhabitants per square mile (503.4/km2). There were 5,201 housing units at an average density of 456.6 per square mile (176.3/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 93.5% White, 1.3% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.3% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.4% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.2% of the population.

There were 5,047 households of which 40.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.5% were married couples living together, 5.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 16.3% were non-families. 13.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.94 and the average family size was 3.25.

The median age in the town was 40.2 years. 27.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.6% were from 25 to 44; 31.2% were from 45 to 64; and 11.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 49.9% male and 50.1% female.

Education

St. John is served mostly by the Lake Central School Corporation (north of 101st Ave and west of Cline Ave), the Hanover Community School Corporation (south of 101st Ave and west of Cline Ave), and the Crown Point Community School Corporation (south of 101st Ave and east of Cline Ave). Three of the ten Lake Central schools are located in Saint John. These include:

In addition to public schools, the community is home to Crown Point Christian School: an evangelical school headed by a parent-owned association. It is also home to St. John the Evangelist Catholic School, a Roman Catholic school.

Awards

In 2009, St. John was ranked 48th on the CNNMoney.com Top 100 "Best Places to Live" list.

In 2014, St. John was ranked as the 4th safest place to live in Indiana. 

 

Highland is a town in Lake CountyIndianaUnited States. The population was 23,727 at the 2010 census. The town was incorporated on April 4, 1910. It is a part of theChicago metropolitan area and North Township, and is surrounded by Hammond to the north, Munster to the west, Schererville to the south and Griffith to the east.

History

 

In 1847, two pioneers from Ohio, Michael and Judith Johnston, became Highland's first settlers. The town slowly expanded until the early 1880s, when the development of Chicago & Atlantic railroad trackage through the town attracted agriculture and manufacturing industries. Dutch settlers began moving to Highland shortly thereafter from nearby Munster.[8] 304 people resided in Highland when it was incorporated in 1910. In 1992, the Indiana Historical Bureau placed a state historical marker at 8941 Kleinman Road (41°33′2″N 87°26′14″W) to recognize the immigration of Dutch in the Calumet Region.

In 1927, President Calvin Coolidge visited and delivered the dedication address for Wicker Memorial Park, located on the west side of the town. Highland, as with other towns along the Little Calumet River, has historically been subject to flooding,[10][11] particularly during spring, and particularly in areas away from Ridge Road, which runs along the highest land in the town. Significant floods have affected Highland in 2008, 2007, and especially in September 2006.

On October 31, 2008, Barack Obama, who four days later would be elected the 44th President of the United States, stopped in Highland towns for a rally that drew 40,000 people to Wicker Park. It was the largest crowd there since President Coolidge dedicated the park in 1927.

Shops in Highland, Indiana (2nd Street & Highway Avenue)

Geography

Highland is located at 41°32′59″N 87°27′29″W (41.549851, -87.458064).

According to the 2010 census, Highland has a total area of 6.96 square miles (18.03 km2), of which 6.94 square miles (17.97 km2) (or 99.71%) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) (or 0.29%) is water.

Neighborhoods

Highland has several neighborhoods and subdivisions. They include: Arbor Hill, Brantwood, Ellendale, Golfmoor, Highland Terrace Estates, Homestead, Hook's, Lakeside, Meadows, Pettit Park, Sandalwood, Southridge, White Oak Estates (of Highland), Wicker Highlands, Wicker Park Estates and Wicker Park Manor (Frog Hollow).

Architecture

Highland's Downtown area features a number of buildings exhibiting Mid-Century Modern style architecture.

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 23,727 people, 9,924 households, and 6,547 families residing in the town. The population density was 3,418.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,320.0/km2). There were 10,335 housing units at an average density of 1,489.2 per square mile (575.0/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 88.6% White, 4.2%African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.6% Asian, 3.4% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.8% of the population.

There were 9,924 households of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.9% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.0% were non-families. 29.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.97.

The median age in the town was 41.5 years. 20.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26% were from 25 to 44; 27.9% were from 45 to 64; and 17.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 48.0% male and 52.0% female.

Transportation

The commercial airport closest to Highland is the Gary/Chicago International Airport in Gary, but most Highland residents and visitors travel from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport orChicago Midway International Airport.

Highland lies just south of the Borman ExpresswayU.S. Route 41, known locally as Indianapolis Boulevard, is a major north-south artery in the town. Due to Highland's proximity to Chicago, several other Interstate and U.S. highways are within a 20-mile (32 km) radius.

The town's pedestrians and cyclists are served by the Erie Lackawanna Trail, a cycling/multiuse, paved rail trail, which cuts diagonally through Highland, connecting the town with Griffith, andCrown Point, to the southeast. The Highland portion of the trail is also known locally as the Crosstown Trail. The trail runs along the former right-of-way of the Erie-Lackawanna and Baltimore and Ohio railroads, and will eventually connect pedestrians to Chicago, Illinois, to the northwest and beyond Crown Point to the southeast by planned trail extensions. The trail also links Highland, by connections with other trails, with Porter County to the east.

Education

The School Town of Highland is the town's public school system, which operates Highland High School, which was established in 1960, as well as a middle school and four elementary schools. The area where the former Main School once stood is marked by a gazebo, which was demolished in October 2006 and rebuilt in 2007. It and the surrounding land are named Main Square Park after the now-defunct school that stood on the site until 1977. One of the other defunct schools, Lincoln Elementary, was converted into a community center in the early 1980s. The other, Orchard Park Elementary, closed in 1981 and was later purchased and reopened as a Calumet Baptist School in the early 1990s.

List of schools – School Town of Highland

  • Highland High School
  • Highland Middle School
  • Judith Morton Johnston Elementary School
  • Mildred Merkley Elementary School
  • Southridge Elementary School
  • Allen J. Warren Elementary School

Highland also contains three private schools. Highland Christian School was originally founded in 1909 and has been in its present building and location since 1951.

Public libraries[

Lake County Public Library operates the Highland Branch at 2841 Jewett Street.

Police Department: Fallen officers

In the history of the Highland Police Department, two officers have been killed while on duty.

Recreation

Wicker Memorial Park, at 8554 Indianapolis Boulevard, is owned and operated by the North Township trustee and was dedicated in 1927. Featured are a 72-par, 18-hole golf course, three miles of trails, volleyball and tennis courts, a dog run, playground, splash pad, picnic areas and banquet facilities.

The Hoosier Prairie State Nature Preserve, established in 1976, is a 1,547-acre wetland prairie habitat located in an area in the vicinity of Main Street and Kennedy Avenue and partially in Highland, Griffith and Schererville. It is a unit of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore and managed by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

Highland Parks and Recreation operates the Lincoln Community Center, Sharp Athletic Complex and the four-mile Erie-Lackawanna Trail. The Main Square Park Gazebo is a popular site for wedding ceremonies as well as a number of community events and festivals during the year. In addition to Homestead, Markley, Meadows and Sheppard parks, which offer shelters for picnics and gatherings, there are 16 other parks maintained with various amenities throughout the town.

List of parks and recreational facilities – Highland Parks and Recreation

  • Brantwood Park
  • Erie-Lackawanna Trail
  • Fletcher Park
  • 45th & 5th Street Park
  • Grand Park
  • Homestead Park
  • Jaycee Park
  • Lakeside Outlot Park
  • Lakeside Park
  • Lincoln Community Center
  • Little Turtle Park
  • Main Square Park
  • Markley Park
  • Meadows Outlot Park
  • Meadows Park
  • Northwood Park
  • Orchard Park
  • Pettit Park
  • Sharp Athletic Complex
  • Sheppard Park
  • Terrace Park
  • Toth Park
  • White Oak Park

Notable people